Photo courtesy of Jodie Emery

My life has been devoted to protesting prohibition and protesting these kinds of arrests, so to be in the situation and experience first-hand what I’m protesting against was in a way helpful. ... But that doesn’t lessen the degrading nature of how I was treated.”

Jodie Emery, discussing with Maclean’s Magazine the arrest of herself and her husband, Marc Emery, for multiple drug-related charges after a police raid of their Canadian dispensary, Cannabis Culture, on March 9. Both are fighting the charges and are continuing their advocacy against cannabis prohibition.

Source: Twitter

“How do you be a kindergartner on muscle relaxers? … You can’t.”

Carey Tilghman, commenting on the prescription of Botox injections and muscle relaxers for her 6-year-old daughter who suffered a stroke. Tilghman lives in Maryland, where implementation of medical marijuana is said to be one of the slowest in the country. Tilghman discovered that a cannabis-filled transdermal patch could potentially shield from the stroke’s brain damage, but is unable to gain access to the treatment due to the delayed rollout.

Source: CBS Baltimore

Quality control is the price of entry into a regulated industry, just like biotechnology and pharmaceuticals.”

Cam Battley, Aurora Cannabis’ executive vice president, to CBC News, regarding Health Canada’s recent act to mandate testing of medical marijuana. The news came shortly after another Canadian producer, Organigram, voluntarily recalled “all of its cannabis buds and oils produced in 2016,” for potential contamination of banned pesticides, according to the Globe and Mail, which also reported that Aurora, which sold Organigram products under Aurora’s name, issued its own voluntary recall for those products.

Sources: CBC News/The Globe and Mail

Photo courtesy of Justice.gov

“The Cole Memorandum set up some policies under President Obama’s Department of Justice about how cases should be selected in those states and what would be appropriate for federal prosecution, much of which I think is valid.”

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reporters during an appearance in Richmond, Va. On March 15, Sessions–who is known as being a prohibitionist–also opined that cannabis is “only slightly less awful” than heroin. Press Secretary Sean Spicer also compared cannabis to heroin in his remarks during a February daily briefing, though he indicated U.S. law enforcement would not crack down on medicinal marijuana businesses.

Source: Huffington Post